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"Historic Milestone: Michigan Takes a Stand Against Child Marriage"

Updated: Oct 10, 2023

In a momentous leap toward protecting the rights of young girls, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has ceremonially signed legislation that makes Michigan the 10th U.S. state to end the alarming practice of child marriage. This achievement marks a historic milestone, as it represents the culmination of a year of tireless advocacy efforts, resulting in legislative victories across three states. As it currently stands, legislators and advocates have helped end child marriage in 20% of the country, liberating 7.5 million girls from the shackles of a harmful legal trap.


As of September 2023, ten states have banned underage marriages, with no exception: Delaware (2018), New Jersey (2018), Pennsylvania (2020), Minnesota (2020), Rhode Island (2021), New York (2021), Massachusetts (2022), Vermont (2023), Connecticut (2023) and Michigan (2023).


A Year of Triumphs - Three Legislative Victories in One Year:

The year has been marked by unprecedented success in the fight against child marriage, with legislative victories in three states—each a resounding declaration that child marriage has no place in the United States. These victories have paved the way for Michigan to join the ranks of states that have taken decisive action to protect the rights and futures of young girls.


Liberating 20% of the Country's Girls

The impact of these legislative victories reverberates far beyond state lines. With child marriage now prohibited in 20% of the country, a staggering 7.5 million girls are liberated from the clutches of a human rights abuse that has far-reaching consequences. This collective triumph is not just a legal milestone; it's a profound step toward safeguarding the well-being and dignity of countless young lives.


Ending a Nightmare Legal Trap

Child marriage is more than a legal loophole; it's a nightmarish legal trap that subjects young girls to untold hardships. The prohibition of child marriage in these states signals an end to a practice that often destroys nearly every aspect of a young girl's life, from her education to her physical and mental well-being.


A Testament to Advocacy:

The successful prohibition of child marriage in Michigan and other states stands as a testament to the unyielding advocacy efforts of individuals, organizations, and communities determined to protect the rights of young girls. It underscores the power of collective action in bringing about positive change and dismantling harmful practices.


Harmful effects of Child Marriage

Child marriage can have devastating consequences on the physical and emotional well-being of young individuals. Robbing them of their childhood, it often leads to early pregnancies, posing serious health risks for both mother and child. Additionally, it perpetuates a cycle of poverty and denies these children the opportunity for education and personal development, hindering their potential for a brighter future. Please view the graphic above for some cruelling details about the consequences of child marriage.

Looking ahead: A Future Free from Child Marriage

As Michigan joins the ranks of states championing the end of child marriage, it reminds us that we still have 40 states to go to provide protection for millions of girls in the country. The work is far from over, but each legislative victory is a step closer to a United States where no child is forced into marriage, and every young girl has the opportunity to make her own choices and build a life on her own terms.

In celebrating the ceremonial signing of legislation in Michigan, we celebrate not just a legal victory but a victory for the rights, dignity, and futures of girls who can now envision a life free from coercion.


Join us in the fight against child marriage! Every child deserves the chance to dream, learn, and grow without the burden of early wedlock. Please visit this link https://www.globalhope365.org/child-marriage to learn more or donate here https://www.globalhope365.org/donations



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